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William Rouen

Insight into the person that is William Rouen.

Story - William's Adversary - Caira Glynfydd

Game Date: 4/28/1075

Who: Guillaume de Rouen a.k.a. William Rouen

Caira Glynfydd was born in western Wales in 1063 to Mathonwy Brynglwr and Magdan Glynfydd. Caira was the third of Mathonwy's six children, and the first of Magdan's three. Caira and her sisters, Bronwyn and Maiglydd, were the illegitimate daughters of Mathonwy and Magdan, and were never more than nominally acknowledged by Mathonwy. Mathonwy reserved his more loving attentions for his three legitimate children with Megan Rhys, who were Owen, Gwydion, and Elonwy. All of Caira's siblings died before reaching adulthood, leaving her as the only legacy of Mathonwy, which pleased him not at all. Owen and Gwydion, the first two of Mathonwy's brood showed some promise, but harsh winter illnesses cut them down before they could reach their promising adulthood. Being the oldest of Mathonwy's daughters didn't help Caira, either. Only Elonwy, born between Bronwyn and Maiglydd, received any love from Mathonwy. Mathonwy belittled, insulted, and berated Caira every chance he got. (She never really noticed her full sisters got the same treatment.) The fact that Caira was the only survivor of the many winter illness that beset her siblings didn't help her, either. Mathonwy's abuse turned Caira against her father's family, as neither he nor his relatives ever really accepted her. When he died in battle against the Normans in 1078 at the hands of either Sir Robert de Rouen or Baron Geoffroi of Crossing March, she didn't feel any significant grief at her father's passing. She did feel the need for vengeance against the Normans, however. She held both Sir Robert and Baron Geoffroi responsible, though she could prove neither had a direct hand in his death. (It was Geoffroi that laid on the killing blow, but nobody involved really realizes that.)

Magdan was the only one who really loved Caira. This motherly love only deepened when her two younger daughters died young. She treated Caira as well as she could, in contrast to Mathonwy's cold brutality. However, she was not well respected among the local women as Mathonwy didn't really respect her. Caira was raised in an interesting environment. She got to live with her cold brutal father who hated her, had great riches, and was greatly respected among his peers as opposed to living with her warm, loving mother, who was not so prosperous and mostly scorned by her peers. The lesson Caira learned was that the cold, brutal abusers got respect and wealth, while the warm and tender got used and cast aside. Magdan realized how her beloved child was growing up and despised it, but Caira learned to ignore and override Magdan just as Mathonwy had. When Magdan died in 1088, she tried one last time to persuade her daughter that warmth and kindness were worth practicing, and that she shouldn't treat others the way her father had treated her. Caira kept the grief and anger of the experience of losing her mother, but completely discarded the advice.

As Caira reached adulthood, the only thing that bloomed more fully than her sorcerous powers was her beauty. She hid the sorcerous powers and used her beauty to use up various males she set her eye upon. She also used her looks to advance her agenda, namely her own self-interest. She was looking to first gain control over her tribe, then all of the other area tribes, then over all of Wales and as much of England as she could grab. She'd already garnered a fair amount of influence before her mother died. Once Magdan died, Caira could devote her full attention to her own plans. When she discovered Edweard Ragnarsson in 1091, she already had a devoted following of Welsh warriors to do her bidding. Her alliance with Edweard gave her a Saxon contingent. She completed her fold with a band of renegade outlaw Bretons. Still, Baron Geoffroi was too powerful a figure to overcome. He had a driven warrior in Sir Robert, and his own experience and courage. Once his nephew Guillaume was knighted, there were three opponents too many. Caira began to hatch plans to whittle the number down. She wasn't really picky about which one she eliminated first. But Sir Guillaume was the first to volunteer himself by dint of the fact that he was Baron Geoffroi's nephew and Sir Robert's son. Caira figured that since Sir Guillaume was being given so much responsibility, he was Baron Geoffroi's favorite nephew. She also figured that she could strike a double blow by disposing of Guillaume. She would emotionally devastate both Sir Robert and Baron Geoffroi at the same time. She waited to see what Edweard could do with him. Caira was outwardly sympathetic but inwardly gleeful at Edweard's frustration with his inability to kill Sir Guillaume. She had found a cave that was magically powerful in her pursuit of sorcerous knowledge. She discovered that she could take things into a certain chamber and make them disappear with a little effort. She learned how to create a wand of power, and with this focus, making things disappear became far easier. She could even make things disappear outside of the cave. When she became able to make warhorses and oxen disappear, she knew she had her vehicle to dispose of Sir Guillaume. She planned hit-and-run raids with Edweard to draw Sir Guillaume into the cave. Caira had Edweard thinking that she was going to kill Sir Guillaume when she let him take the bloodthirsty Bretons with him. But when luring Sir Guillaume into the cave chamber, she used the wand and made him disappear with a flash. When Edweard ran into the chamber over all of his dead Welsh, Breton, and Saxon comrades, he was surprised to see Caira and not Sir Guillaume. "Sir Guillaume will no longer be a problem," said Caira. "Now we can work on killing Sir Robert and Baron Geoffroi."

Record Last Changed Date: 11/28/2009


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